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TACACS.net was built from the ground up with the user in mind. It's fast, simple, and easy to deploy.

Runs on Windows Workstation or Server

TACACS.net can be installed on a Windows Server or desktop system. Windows Server is preferred for better performance and Active Directory integration, but can also be run on a Windows desktop system with local Users and Groups, or with local static credentials configured within the system.

Pre-compiled software with installation wizard

The software does not require compiling and comes with an easy to use installation wizard to get you up and running within minutes

Active Directory Integration

Integrates seamlessly with Active Directory without requiring any additional software. You can create profiles based on groups or subgroups already configured in AD. Users can authenticate using their Windows username and password.

Runs as a Windows service

Windows start/stop/reload

No dependencies

TACACS.net software does not require any other languages or interpreters like Perl, Java, or Python. This simplifies installation and reduces complexity and troubleshooting.

Full support for the TACACS+ protocol

Supports the TACACS+ protocol defined in RFC 1492 and IETF Draft.

Simple Configuration

Intuitive configuration with text-based XML files.

Granular & Flexible Policies

Policies can be set by user, IP address, subnet, IP range, device type, day, or time of day. Policies can also overlap, enabling the administrator to set multiple policies including fallback groups.

Downloadable ACLs for authenticated users

Downloadable ACLs are supported to restrict users for VPNs and proxy authentication.

Vendor-Specific Attributes

Unlimited Vendor specific Attributes (VSAs) are supported.

TACTest command-line testing tool

TACTest is used for testing and debugging TACACS+ servers. It can be used in stand-alone mode with or without the TACACS.net server. It can log TACACS+ requests and responses, it is scriptable, and can be used to run performance tests against a target server.

Password Encryption

DES encryption for local authentication with text files increases security. Utility included for creating encrypted passwords and shared secrets.

Multi-Factor Authentication

Includes Google Authenticator for multi-factor authentication. Utility included for creating managing shared secrets. More info.

Unrestricted license

  • No restrictions on users, clients, or servers.
  • Install on as many servers as needed.
  • Software will not revert or stop working after a period of time.
Find out more about the product here.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/ronaldxbartels/

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